Posts tagged shared purpose
Three Core Obstacles to Improving Social Determinants of Health

Healthcare is ideally positioned to catalyze the critical reorganization necessary to improve social determinants of health to help both healthcare and education succeed. But improvement will require systems and thinking that are focused on the whole more than the parts being changed.

Read More
Fostering Hope: Integrated Care Treats the Cause, Not the Symptoms

If healthy, strong communities are what we want to see, we’ve been going about it all wrong. Learn about an Oregon group’s network approach to community health.

Read More
You can’t know what you can’t see

All of us have a personal narrative grown from firsthand experience that filters and shapes our understanding and perspective. It can also blind us to growing problems and innovative solutions. Being able to see the whole is job one for understanding how our healthcare system works and for being able to make it work better.

Read More
Network business models will revolutionize community health

Since the 1990s, the cost of medical care has seen the greatest rate of inflation across all sectors, suppressing wages and limiting economic growth. The system is an enormously complicated technical approach to a complex problem. But complicated is not complex, and only complexity can manage complexity; working harder at the old paradigm won’t yield a different outcome. It doesn’t need to be this way.

Read More
Growing value from Social Determinants of Health

Huge cost and quality improvements are possible by integrating Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) into medical care. Achieving this will be possible when we embrace management methods aligned with the reality of healthcare as a Complex Adaptive System; managing the whole instead of the parts and focusing on individual patients, not populations.

Read More
Preparing to integrate the social determinants of health

We know social determinants of health (SDH) have a major effect on health outcomes and cost. Numerous observational studies of spending patterns show large savings, but few have captured data-driven examples to isolate portable methods for success. The reason is that the medicine and social sciences are miles apart in science, approach, and attitude.

Read More